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DEA Revokes Drug Wholesale Distributor Morris & Dickson’s License Over Opioid Crisis Failures

The US Drug Enforcement Administration stripped one of the nation’s largest drug distributors of its license to sell highly addictive painkillers on Friday after ruling it failed to report thousands of suspicious orders at the height of the opioid crisis. Sadness’ action against Morris & Dickson Co. which threatens to bankrupt it comes two days after an Associated Press investigation found the DEA allowed the company to continue shipping drugs for nearly four years after a Judge had recommended harsher punishment for his knight’s violation of rules designed to prevent opiate abuse. The DEA acknowledged that the time it took to issue its final decision was longer than normal for the agency, but blamed Morris & Dickson in part for delaying the process by asking for delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its long search for a deal that the agency said it was considering. The order will go into effect in 90 days, allowing more time to negotiate a settlement. DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said in the 68-page order that Morris & Dickson did not accept full responsibility for its past actions, which included shipping 12,000 unusually large orders of opioids to pharmacies and hospitals between 2014 and 2014. 2018. During this period, the company filed only three reports of suspicious orders with the DEA. I didn’t think a single person was hurt by (their) drugs. Those statements from the president of a family business so severely miss the point of requirements for a DEA registrant, she wrote. Her acceptance of responsibility did not demonstrate that she or her principals understood the full extent of their transgression…and the potential harm it caused. Wales and placed an advert in a local newspaper selling medicines. It has since grown into the nation’s fourth-largest wholesale drug distributor, with annual revenues of $4 billion and nearly 600 employees serving pharmacies and hospitals in 29 states. it said it had invested millions of dollars in recent years revamping its compliance systems and seemed to have hopes for a deal, noting that the order gives 90 days before it takes effect.

The US Drug Enforcement Administration on Friday stripped one of the nation’s largest drug distributors of its license to sell highly addictive painkillers after ruling it failed to report thousands of suspicious orders at the height of the opioid crisis.

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The action against Morris & Dickson Co. which threatens to bankrupt it comes two days after an Associated Press investigation found the DEA allowed the company to continue shipping drugs for nearly four years after a judge had recommended more severe punishment for his contemptuous disregard of regulations designed to prevent opioid abuse.

The DEA acknowledged that the time it took to issue its final decision was longer than normal for the agency, but accused Morris & Dickson in part of delaying the process by asking for delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the his long search for a deal that the agency said it was considering. The order becomes effective in 90 days, allowing more time to negotiate a deal.

DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said in the 68-page order that Morris & Dickson did not accept full responsibility for its past actions, which included shipping 12,000 unusually large orders of opioids to pharmacies and hospitals between 2014 and 2018. During this period, the company filed only three reports of suspicious orders with the DEA.

Milgram specifically cited then-President Paul Dickson Sr.’s testimony in 2019 that the company’s compliance program was damn good and he didn’t think a single person was harmed by (their) drugs.

Those statements from the president of a family-owned business so strongly miss the point of requirements for a DEA registrant, he wrote. Her acceptance of responsibility did not demonstrate that she or her principals understood the full extent of their wrongdoing…and the potential harm it caused.”

Morris & Dickson, based in Shreveport, Louisiana, traces its roots back to the 1840s, when its namesake founder arrived from Wales and placed an ad in a local newspaper selling medicines. It has since grown into the nation’s fourth-largest wholesale drug distributor, with annual revenues of $4 billion and nearly 600 employees serving pharmacies and hospitals in 29 states.

In a statement, the company said it has invested millions of dollars in recent years to revamp its compliance systems and appears to be holding out hopes for a deal, noting that the order allows for 90 days before it goes into effect.

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